5/24 Rule

Tag Archives for 5/24 Rule.

Curing 5/24

Curing 5/24

Recent developments have made me think more about Chase’s 5/24 Rule (where they deny applicants who have opened 5 or more cards in the past 24 months).  First, Chase released two new and very attractive cards: the Sapphire Reserve card and the Ink Business Preferred card, Then, they promised to release more new cards.  Soon thereafter, those with Chase Private Client status lost their immunity to 5/24.  Then, seemingly unrelated, one of the best options for…

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Chase Special Consideration vs. 5/24

Chase Special Consideration

In the post “Chase Special Consideration,” I wrote about the special reconsiderations forms that a Chase banker can fill out on your behalf (if you have at least $10K on deposit) to help turn a credit card application from a denial to approval.  In fact, the process worked brilliantly for me with my Chase Ink Plus application.  I had hoped that it would work, in general, to break the 5/24 rule. What is the 5/24…

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Flying under 5/24

Flying under 5/24

In the post, “Breaking 5/24,” I described a number of ways in which it might be possible to get approved for Chase credit cards despite having signed up for 5 or more new cards in the past 24 months.  So far, reports of success have been mixed.  Another option, of course, is to stay under the limit.  Luckily, there appears to be a way to do so without giving up all of those great signup…

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The Chase authorized user dilemma for 2 adult households

authorized user

When signing up for a new Chase card, should you add your spouse or other household member as an authorized user?  The combination of Chase’s 5/24 rule, Chase’s point transfer rules, and Chase’s signup bonus offers make the answer to this question surprisingly difficult.  The point transfer rules and the signup bonuses encourage adding authorized users, but the 5/24 rule discourages it.  I’ll explain… Chase’s 5/24 rule In the past year or so, Chase has…

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