Chase point transfer rules made simple [Infographic]

My favorite points programs are transferable points programs.  These are programs that let the account holder transfer points to their choice of a number of airline and hotel programs.  See: A quick guide to transferable points programs.  My favorite transferable points program is Chase Ultimate Rewards…

Complex Chase point transfer rules

In addition to allowing point transfers to a variety of airline and hotel program, Chase lets you transfer points from one card account to another, or from one person’s account to another, or from one person’s account to another person’s airline or hotel account.  Chase has strict rules about these point transfers.  In some cases, the point recipient must be a household member and an authorized user on your account.  In some cases it’s possible to transfer points to someone outside of your household.  When you move points from one Chase account to another, Chase calls this “Combine points”.  When you move points from a Chase account to an airline or hotel loyalty program, Chase calls this “Transfer points”.  Chase has different rules for combining points than for transferring points.

Chase point transfer rules made simple

To help explain Chase’s point combine and transfer rules, I teamed up with Travel Is Free to develop an infographic, shown below.

chase transfers infographic4

Additional details

Chase has more Ultimate Rewards cards than those shown above.  Chase Sapphire, Ink Classic, and Ink Bold are no longer available to new applicants, but many people still carry these cards.  Additionally, there’s the JP Morgan Palladium card, available only to Chase Private Client customers.  Soon, Chase will also offer the Chase Freedom Unlimited card.  Here’s how to read the above infographic for these cards:

  • Sapphire (not Sapphire Preferred) and Freedom Unlimited follow the same rules as the Freedom card.
  • Ink Classic follows the same rules as Ink Cash.
  • JP Morgan Palladium follows the same rules as Sapphire Preferred.
  • Ink Bold follows the same rules as Ink Plus.

Rules in text form, straight from Chase

Here are the rules as written on Chase’s website as of 3/7/2016:

Combine points personal cards:

You can move your points, but only to another Chase card with Ultimate Rewards belonging to you, or one member of your household. If we suspect that you’ve engaged in fraudulent activity related to your credit card account or Ultimate Rewards, or that you’ve misused Ultimate Rewards in any way (for example by buying or selling points, moving or transferring points with or to an ineligible third party or account, or repeatedly opening or otherwise maintaining credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards) we may temporarily prohibit you from earning points or using points you’ve already earned. If we believe you’ve engaged in any of these acts, we’ll close your credit card account and you’ll lose all your points.

Combine points business cards:

You can move your points, but only to another Chase card with Ultimate Rewards belonging to you, one member of your household, or your joint business owner, as applicable. If we suspect that you’ve engaged in fraudulent activity related to your credit card account or Ultimate Rewards, or that you’ve misused Ultimate Rewards in any way (for example by buying or selling points, moving or transferring points with or to an ineligible third party or account, or repeatedly opening or otherwise maintaining credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards) we may temporarily prohibit you from earning points or using points you’ve already earned. If we believe you’ve engaged in any of these acts, we’ll close your credit card account and you’ll lose all your points.

Transfer points to loyalty programs:

For Consumer Card accounts, you may only transfer points to yourself or one additional household member who is listed as an authorized user on your card account. For Business Card accounts, you may only transfer points to yourself or an owner of the company who is listed as an authorized user on your card account.

See more cool stuff

If you enjoyed this infographic and want to see more, see Travel is Free’s InfoGraphics page.

About Greg The Frequent Miler

Greg is the owner, founder, and primary author of the Frequent Miler. He earns millions of points and miles each year, mostly without flying, and dedicates this blog to teaching others how to do the same.

More articles by Greg The Frequent Miler »

Pingbacks

Comments

  1. What makes a household?
    For example, my father has a freedom that I am already an AU on but no UR points. He lives at address A. I live at address B and have other UR cards. I would like to convert my freedom to the FU and use his freedom occasionally and combine points down the road. Can I change his address to address B so that he is part of the same household? I have 100’s of thousands of UR so I don’t want to do anything to risk these points but how would chase know whether my father lives with me or not? I plan on changing the address well in advance (years?) of ever combining points. Thanks.

    • A household is a single address. Yes, I expect that your scheme would work as long as your father doesn’t have any other Chase accounts that would remain tied to his current address. Another option would be for you and your dad to start a business together and have him get a Chase Ink card (the no-fee Ink Cash would work). Then he could move points from his Freedom to his Ink to you.

  2. Stop the presses… you teamed up with travelisfree? Wowzer. Drew’s been largely MIA this year, esp. after the birdcopalypse…. (ignoring countless questions on his blog and email….. and largely being aloof as anything, esp. about his pushing-the-envelope ms.) Ah, pardon the sour grapes. Congratulations on being able to track him down, and hope he and Carrie are well.

    • Great posts & graphics, all the same — may the collaborations continue.

      Did squirm on two points:

      1. the new rule about transfer to a business co-owner could be a serious issue for many families. Spouse and I have separate ventures, separate schedules C’s — yet we file joint tax return. (dumb question perhaps, but does that make us “co-owners?” — technically, for purposes here)

      2. And as for the stipulation about shutting down those of us who “repeatedly opening or otherwise maintaining credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards.”

      Ummmm, wouldn’t that be essentially everybody who reads this blog? et vous, aussie? How did you handle that one with your Chase handler? (serious question)

      • 1. I don’t know the answer, but does it matter? If you’re in the same household you can combine points back and forth regardless. It is only for transferring to loyalty programs that it could be an issue.
        2. Chase has had those scary terms for a while now, but hasn’t enforced them (to my knowledge).
        Chase handler: by that I assume you mean the person I deal with regarding a Chase affiliate relationship? Chase dumped me as an affiliate almost a year ago. Regardless, I don’t think Chase would mind people explaining their rules to the public as we did with this infographic.

  3. I have an Ink+ and old Ink Bold card. My wife is an AU for my IB card, but not an AU for my Ink+ card now that Chase counts AU cards for signups. She is not listed as a co-owner for the IB card, so does that mean I cannot transfer points to her partner accounts even though we’re married and live in the same household? I should be able to combine points from any of my UR cards to any of her UR cards though, right?

    • I haven’t tested this, but I bet that since your wife is an AU on your Ink Bold card and she is presumably in the same household, you should be able to move points to your Ink Bold and then to her loyalty accounts. I really doubt Chase would do anything to check whether she is really a business co-owner (but I could be wrong!). Yes, you can freely combine UR points to any of her UR cards.

  4. There is another hidden rule: you can transfer UR points to only one loyalty program of a specific travel partner per person per year.

    I tried to transfer points to my second United account a while ago, and got this message:
    “You entered a second loyalty account number to transfer to. We are unable to
    process this transfer online. Please call the number on the back of your
    card for assistance.”
    I called Chase twice, got the same words as I described above, and the CSR could not override this.

    • Wait, I’m confused, what does this mean?

      “There is another hidden rule: you can transfer UR points to only one loyalty program of a specific travel partner per person per year.”

      My wife has status as Hyatt and Marriott from work trips so we usually book awards under her accounts. If I transfer from my UR to her Hyatt account, does that mean I cannot transfer from my UR to her Marriott in the same year?

      • @Steve, your scenario is fine. If your wife had two separate Hyatt accounts in her name and you wanted to transfer some points to one of her Hyatt accounts and other points to another account — that’s where it wouldn’t work.

  5. Very nice infographic. I work in the data visualization space, and appreciate the clean work that Drew does. Also knowing the Chase UR program intimately, you guys communicated it very nicely.

    A quick note/critique in that regard: you have card icons with stars, but the star isn’t explained / represented (in terms of meaning) anywhere. As an adept in this game, I can ‘read’ that they’re the premium cards that allow Transfers out to external programs, but others might not.

  6. I have 400k UR points in a Freedom account. I can’t get the SP or ink because of 5/24 rule. My wife should be able to. Can I become an AU on her account despite my own 5/24 predicament? Does it matter if she adds me at time of application or later? Thank you

  7. So, my recently ex-wife and I both have two freedom cards and an Ink plus. We shared the same address for years, still share some finances (along with a child), but as of a few months now, have different addresses. Wonder if I should call Chase and ask about combining points from Freedom to Freedom, or just do it and hope for the best?

  8. I have a CSP card with my wife being the authorized user. Can my wife apply CSR and get the sign up bonus? Or do I need to remove her from the CSP authorized user list before she can apply? Secondly, after she gets the sign up bonus, it is possible for us to merge points rignt?

  9. My wife has a Chase Sapphire card and I’m an Authorized User on her card. If I got a Chase Freedom card or an Ink Cash card (not the tier 2 cards, but the cash back cards) can I transfer those rewards to her so we can earn the 5X points, or do I need to open up a tier 2 card (Sapphire, Ink Plus, etc) to be able to transfer the points to her account?

    I understand that she could just open the Ink Cash or Freedom card, but I wanted to give it a shot first, especially since our side business is in my name.

  10. So to be clear, does the Chase Ink Cash card give you the ability to transfer points to travel partners? Your infographics seem to imply no

    • That is correct — the Ink Cash alone can not transfer to partners. You need a Sapphire Reserve, Sapphire Preferred, Ink Plus, or Ink Business Preferred to transfer to partners (or perhaps one of the old varieties of Bold that is no longer available — Ink Plus is no longer available either).

  11. I guess this is a *hypothetical*. Say I want to transfer points to my girlfriend–different address. I open the Ink Plus Business Preferred and list her as a co-owner of the business (not much of one), and she is an AU. Can I transfer the 80,000 points to her UR account (which she could then transfer to her Sapphire Reserve account)? She booked a trip for me using her own UR points so this is to reimburse her. Would that work?

    • Theoretically that should work. You wouldn’t transfer points to her Ink card though: as an AU she can’t hold any points in that account. But, you should be able to transfer points to her Sapphire Reserve based on my understanding of the rules. A more certain way to make this happen would be if she also opened her own Ink card under the same business name and EIN as you. That way you can transfer points to her business card.

  12. This may be a stupid question. Does it matter which account I log on to do the combine points/add account between my wife freedom acct and my chase reserve sapphire acct? I will want to transfer from her acct to my acct. She just got her freedom card. She doesn’t have points til the end of the statement, so I can’t do the combine points/add user option on her acct. If I add her acct from my chase reserve login will it automatically allow me to transfer points from her freedom acct to my chase reserve when she has points? Or will I have to wait until she has points and do it from her acct?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *